"visualizing AMPA receptor synaptic plasticity in vivo"张勇 博士(Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)-2015.12.30
发布时间:2015-12-30 

"visualizing AMPA receptor synaptic plasticity in vivo"张勇 博士(Johns Hopkins University  School of Medicine)-2015.12.30

时间:2015年12月30日 13:00

地点:中北校区 脑功能基因组学研究所一楼会议室

报告题目:visualizing AMPA receptor synaptic plasticity in vivo

报告人:张勇 博士 Johns Hopkins University  School of Medicine

主持人:林龙年 教授

 

报告人简介: Yong Zhang Ph.D, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Yong Zhang obtained Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2008. Since 2008, he started his postdoctoral training in Dr. Richard Huganir's lab in Johns Hopkins University with research of visualization of NMDA receptor-dependent AMPA receptor synaptic plasticity in vivo. His research work  was published on Nature Neuroscience and featured by Nature Neuroscience, Hopkins Medicine news release and Chemical and Engineering News.

 

报告简介:Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) membrane trafficking is critical for synaptic plasticity, as well as for learning and memory. However, the mechanisms of AMPAR trafficking in vivo remain elusive. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy in the mouse somatosensory barrel cortex, we found that acute whisker stimulation led to a significant increase in the intensity of surface AMPAR GluA1 subunit (sGluA1) in both spines and dendritic shafts and a small increase in spine size relative to prestimulation values. Interestingly, the initial spine properties biased spine changes following whisker stimulation. Changes in spine sGluA1 intensity were positively correlated with changes in spine size and dendritic shaft sGluA1 intensity following whisker stimulation. The increase in spine sGluA1 intensity evoked by whisker stimulation was NMDA receptor dependent and long lasting, similar to major forms of synaptic plasticity in the brain. In this study we were able to observe experience-dependent AMPAR trafficking in real time and characterize, in vivo, a major form of synaptic plasticity in the brain.