"Marmoset as a model system for studying the neural basis of audition and social interactions"王小勤博士(Johns Hopkins University )-2015.1.9
发布时间:2015-01-09 

"Marmoset as a model system for studying the neural basis of audition and social interactions"王小勤博士(Johns Hopkins University )-2015.1.9

时间:2015年1月9日 10:30

地点:俊秀楼二楼报告厅

报告题目:Marmoset as a model system for studying the neural basis of audition and social interactions

报告人:王小勤 博士 Johns Hopkins University

 

报告人简介:美国Johns Hopkins University 教授,1984年毕业于四川大学无线电系本科;1985年赴美国University of Michigan 电子工程及计算机科学系学习, 次年获硕士学位;1986年进入美国Johns Hopkins University医学院生物医学工程系攻读博士学位, 开始进行对神经系统的研究,1991年在该校获得生物医学工程专业博士学位;1991至1995年在美国University of California at San Francisco Keck神经科学中心进行博士后研究。1995年至今任职于Johns Hopkins University医学院生物医学工程系,神经科学系和耳鼻喉科系,现任终身正教授。王小勤教授于2007-2010年任清华大学教育部“长江学者”特聘讲座教授。2010年起被聘为清华大学兼职教授,生物医学工程系主任,国家“千人计划”入选者。并担任“清华大学-约翰霍普金斯大学生物医学工程联合研究中心”主任。王小勤教授的研究方向包括听觉大脑皮层处理语音信号和音乐信号的机制,听觉系统在复杂声场中提取信号的原理。灵长类大脑控制发声和听觉反馈的机理,以及注意力和行为对听觉大脑皮层的调制。

 

报告简介:Properly chosen animal models are pivotal in understanding brain mechanisms for behaviors. Research on the primate auditory system has been hampered for the lack of appropriate animal models with adequate vocal behaviors in laboratory conditions. We have developed a new model system to study neural basis of audition and vocal communication using the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a highly vocal New World primate species. Marmosets have a rich repertoire of communication calls and remain highly vocal in captivity. Anatomically, marmosets have a smooth brain that provides easy access to many regions of the cerebral cortex for electrophysiological and optical recordings. They are easily bred and have a high reproductive rate, making it feasible to conduct developmental and transgenic studies. Using this unique model system, we have identified non-linear transformations of time-varying signals in auditory cortex and revealed harmonic organizations of this cortical region. We also showed that cortical representations of self-produced vocalizations are shaped by auditory feedback and vocal control signals during vocal communication. These findings have important implications for understanding how the brain processes speech and music and how it operates during speaking. They also demonstrate the potential of this non-human primate species in studying the neural basis of social interactions.